A Servant’s Dream by Andrea Young

by Andrea Young

A Servant’s Dream

Written on September 11, 2017

At twenty-seven-years-old, Alfredos Sayelo was wicked, drunk, and near death when he recalled his boyhood desire to serve God. When he awoke from his stupor, he hungered for the Word of the Lord.

He visited countless denominational churches and Bible schools in Namibia desperate to learn the Scripture. They shunned him because he did not have a high-school certificate or money. One day a teacher from “The Church of the Living God” came to Alfredos while he was reading the Bible.The man asked him if he understood what he was reading and when he said, “No,” the man explained it to him. Following the lesson the teacher boasted about his “Evangelist” credential. This discouraged Alfredos because he wanted to learn the Bible and teach others like that man was; he thought he wouldn’t have the chance.

Not long after, Alfredos was searching Google when a World Bible School advertisement appeared. He registered and was accepted. Then, Mary McKinney, a beloved sister of the Lord, adopted him and guided him into the knowledge of the truth.

Mary saw he had a soft heart, and continually encouraged Alfredos with advice on how to overcome the problems in his life. The more he learned and studied, the more he changed. One day, Alfredos learned how to be forgiven. Guilt washed over him because he still had sin in his life. He then repented and was ready to be baptized.

Mary sought a person to immerse him and God sent a minister named Lukas Kamono to baptize him at the Kehmu church of Christ near Rundu, Namibia on April 2, 2017. Alfredos now continues his Bible study with Mary through World English Institute. She is happy that God allows her to help Alfredos and is thankful that he is a young man who has a “noble and good heart” (Luke 8:15). She praises God for the increase to His kingdom and is looking forward to meeting Alfredos in heaven one day.

Now as a Christian, Alfredos is grateful that God answered his prayers and directed him to WBS. He now has peace and the strength to overcome sin. He says,

I will always feed myself with His Word, and I will be ready to teach others about Him. My dream to be a servant of God has been fulfilled.

Let us faithfully serve the Lord like our brother and sister in Christ.

 

 

As we seek to make disciples, do we need to be discipled?

Melissa Anderson | The Christian Chronicle

February 2017

Melissa Anderson | What We’re Reading

I’m in the middle of two books: “Multiply” by Frances Chan and “Radical” by David Platt. Both focus on how Jesus called Christians to make disciples among the people.

Francis Chan. Multiply: Disciples Making Disciples. Colorado Springs, Colo: David C. Cook Publishing, 2012. 336 pages.

As I study, I’m somewhat convicted that there are more things I could — and should — be doing. But mostly, if I’m being honest, I feel pretty good about the work I’m doing. I spend time helping others. I set a good example. I’m vocal about my beliefs. My faith is strong. My prayer life is strong. I’m studying a good deal.

Really, I’m in a good place.

As I think about ways I can disciple others, it starts to hit me. All of these things I feel good about doing also are things that other people do for me. Others share their faith with me. They pray for me. They study with me. Are they discipling me? Do I need to be discipled? Yes, in fact, I do.

David Platt. Radical: Taking Back Your Faith from the American Dream. Colorado Springs, Colo: Multnomah, 2010. 240 pages.

It’s extremely humbling, but all of us need someone to show us how to become even more like Christ. We will never reach a point where we don’t need to learn more about him and his ways.

My problem with this is my pride. I don’t want to be discipled. I don’t like the idea of people doing things for me out of a sense of obligation. I don’t like the idea that someone would look at me and see a sin or a flaw that needs work. I don’t like the idea of being someone’s project.

The truth is that I need those who are wiser in their faith than I am to guide me. I need someone to point out my sin when I can’t see it for myself. It’s tough to acknowledge that we are flawed, that we need each other. It’s tough to let others take care of us. It’s tough to be discipled.

As I read these books, my focus isn’t only on how I can apply them toward making disciples of others, but also how I can be more open to allowing others to make a stronger disciple out of me. It isn’t about me anyway. It’s about God and bringing him glory.

MELISSA ANDERSON is a military spouse of 18 years. She and her husband, Joshua, have three children and worship with the Gateway Church of Christ in Pensacola, Fla. She has a Master of Business Administration degree and is pursuing a master’s in marriage and family therapy.

WHAT ARE YOU READING? Share your thoughts on the books, music and films that inform, influence or impact your faith. Send your suggestions to erik@christianchronicle.org

http://www.christianchronicle.org/article/as-we-seek-to-make-disciples-do-we-need-to-be-discipled